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Welcome to our blog

A guide to the different types of mortgages

When choosing a mortgage, interest rates and fees aren’t the only factors that you need to be aware of. There are two main types of mortgages – fixed rate and variable rate. Fixed rate means the interest you’re charged stays the same for a set number of years. Variable rate means the interest on your mortgage can change.

Car mechanic tricks and how to avoid them

If you need a repair or service carried out on your car, it’s important that you understand that there are a few operators out there who don’t exactly play by the rules. It’s unfortunate, but it does happen, which is why we want to help you avoid the small tricks that some car mechanics use when repairing and servicing cars.

5 ways to increase the value of your home

If you’re planning on selling your home and want as much money as possible from the sale, it’s important that you understand how to increase its value. There are obvious ways to do this - like having a new bathroom fitted - but they can be expensive and time consuming, so we’re going to stick to the simple things.

How to cut the cost of travel insurance if you have pre-existing medical conditions

If you’ve just booked your summer holiday, the next step is to make sure you have travel insurance to cover you if you fall ill or you need to cancel. There are hundreds of different policies available but if you have pre-existing medical conditions you could be faced with a big bill. However, you don’t have to pay over the odds and there are ways you can cut the cost.

What is the ISA allowance this year?

You can put £20,000 into a cash ISA in for the 2019/20 tax year, which will end on 5 April 2020. Any money you put into this account will not be taxed, so you’re free to earn interest on it which will in turn boost your savings.

Why things have got worse for credit card borrowers

If you have a big purchase on the way, then a credit card that offers interest-free spending can be a godsend. These cards some with a set 0% period on the money you spend, meaning you can pay your balance off in manageable monthly chunks. Each and every penny you repay will go towards reducing your debt, rather than a portion of your repayments having to go on interest charges.

The bank accounts people are switching to - and why

Bank accounts can be useful in all sorts of ways, besides simply being a place for your employer to pay your wages or for your bills to come out of. There are loads of different bank accounts in the UK, and while plenty are pretty mediocre, there are some that stand out by offering something a little different.

How to cut the cost of cruise insurance?

You’ve just booked your next cruise, checked the weather forecast and are starting to think about what clothes you’ll need but what about insurance? It’s not the most exciting part of a holiday but it could potentially save you a lot of money if something goes wrong.

How to get a better deal on a new car

Driving is a necessity for millions of us, but it’s not exactly cheap. There are so many ongoing charges that come with getting behind the wheel, from car insurance to vehicle excise duty, let alone the actual cost of filling up at the pump.

Will I have to pay stamp duty?

There are all sorts of costs to consider when buying a new house, besides the actual cost of the property itself. There are moving costs, legal fees and of course stamp duty.

How do credit builder cards work?

Credit builder cards are a good way for those with poor credit scores to boost their credit history. It’s easier to get one of these cards if your credit score is less than perfect and if you follow the rules and repay the debt each month, they can be a real help in rebuilding your credit score. Here we list the five things you need to know before applying for one.

The No Spend Challenge. How Long Can You Go?

You may have heard of the No Spend Challenge. It received a lot of publicity when personal finance journalist, Michelle McGagh published her book The No Spend Year: How to Spend Less and Live More. Her goal was to pay off a chunk of her large London mortgage and her experiment meant she was able to pay down £22,000

How to spot an HMRC scam

The start of April marks the beginning of a new tax year. And while this brings with it a host of unwelcome price and tax increases, it’s also a prime time of year for scammers posing as HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC).

How to Set Long-Term Financial Goals

Long-term financial goals can feel daunting, and it is easy to get distracted by day to day living. Saving for large purchases, such as education, a car or even a house, can feel like an impossible mountain to climb, but we have put together some useful tips and ideas to help you set long-term financial goals and stick to them.